Dec 10, 2012

Step-by-Step Guide of Oracle Solaris 11 Zones

http://techsupportpk.blogspot.com/2013/08/sol11zones.html


This tutorial will help you, how to create an Oracle Solaris Zone, install an application in that zone, and clone the zone. This article will also help you to get familiar with the basic operations of Solaris 11 Zone configuration and management.

Overview of the Environment We Will Implement

In this how-to guide, I will set up three Oracle Solaris Zones, one to host an environment for developers (devzone) and two to host Web applications (webappzone1 and webappzone2).

Each zone will highlight a simple feature of getting started with zones:
  • With devzone, we'll see how to create a zone using the command line.
  • With webappzone1, we'll see how to add an application to a zone.
  • With webappzone2, we'll see how to clone a zone.
After following the procedures in this tutorial, you will have three zone environments configured as shown in image below. Each zone will have its file system placed on the /zones ZFS data set and will have an exclusive network connection through the physical data link (network port net1). The Web app zones will also have the Apache Web server application.

Three Zones Accessing a Network Port with Their File Systems on /zones

Note: "Global zone" refers to the default zone for the system, which is also used for system-wide administrative control.

Now that we understand what we are trying to do, we will go through the steps for achieving our goal.
Following image shows the settings we will use.




Creating Your First Zone: devzone

This tutorial concentrates on the tasks that are necessary to get Oracle Solaris Zone instances up and running quickly.

Before We Start

Check the status of both the ZFS file system and the network:
root@labsrv:~# zfs list | grep zones
root@labsrv:~# dladm show-link
LINK                CLASS     MTU    STATE    OVER
net1                phys      1500   unknown  --
net0                phys      1500   up       --
 

Step 1: Configure an Oracle Solaris Zone

Let's start by creating a simple test zone using the command line.
root@labsrv:~# zonecfg -z devzone
Use 'create' to begin configuring a new zone.
zonecfg:devzone> create
create: Using system default template 'SYSdefault'
zonecfg:devzone> create
create: Using system default template 'SYSdefault'
zonecfg:devzone> set zonepath=/zones/devzone
zonecfg:devzone> set autoboot=true
zonecfg:devzone> set bootargs="-m verbose"
zonecfg:devzone> verify
zonecfg:devzone> commit
zonecfg:devzone> exit

In this case, we have named the zone devzone and we have chosen /zones/devzone as the location under which the zone will be installed. Also, the zone will automatically start on boot in a verbose manner. We do this so that we don't have to start the zone manually after a system reboot and so we can see all the services start up.

By default, all Oracle Solaris Zones are configured to have an automatic VNIC called anet, which gives us a network device automatically. We cannot see this network device yet, because it is automatically created when the zone is booted and also automatically destroyed on shutdown. We can check this with the dladm command:

root@labsrv:~# dladm show-link
LINK                CLASS     MTU    STATE    OVER
net1                phys      1500   unknown  --
net0                phys      1500   up       --

root@labsrv:~# zoneadm list -cv
  ID NAME             STATUS     PATH                           BRAND    IP
   0 global           running    /                              solaris  shared
   - devzone          configured /zones/devzone                 solaris  excl

Step 2: Install the Zone

Now that the zone has been configured, we need to install it.
It is important to understand that Oracle Solaris Zones in Oracle Solaris 11 are created by using the IPS feature. You will need to ensure you have access to your IPS repository. In this case, we have network access to our IPS repository.

root@labsrv:~# zoneadm -z devzone install
The following ZFS file system(s) have been created:
    rpool/zones
    rpool/zones/devzone
Progress being logged to /var/log/zones/zoneadm.20130828T045714Z.devzone.instal                                                                                         l
       Image: Preparing at /zones/devzone/root.

 AI Manifest: /tmp/manifest.xml.qFaOde
  SC Profile: /usr/share/auto_install/sc_profiles/enable_sci.xml
    Zonename: devzone
Installation: Starting ...

              Creating IPS image
Startup linked: 1/1 done
              Installing packages from:
                  solaris
                      origin:  http://172.22.2.10/
DOWNLOAD                                PKGS         FILES    XFER (MB)   SPEED
Completed                            183/183   33556/33556  222.2/222.2  221k/s

PHASE                                          ITEMS
Installing new actions                   46825/46825
Updating package state database                 Done
Updating image state                            Done
Creating fast lookup database                   Done
Installation: Succeeded

        Note: Man pages can be obtained by installing pkg:/system/manual

 done.

        Done: Installation completed in 160 seconds.


  Next Steps: Boot the zone, then log into the zone console (zlogin -C)

              to complete the configuration process.

Log saved in non-global zone as /zones/devzone/root/var/log/zones/zoneadm.20130                                                                                         828T045714Z.devzone.install

The zone was installed in just 160 seconds. This is very quick when compared with other virtualization technologies and reflects the lightweight nature of Oracle Solaris Zones.
We can check on the status of our zone using the zoneadm command:

root@labsrv:~# zoneadm list -iv
  ID NAME             STATUS     PATH                           BRAND    IP
   0 global           running    /                              solaris  shared
   - devzone          installed  /zones/devzone                 solaris  excl

The zonepath must live on a ZFS data set, and it is created automatically when the zone is installed. You can check that by using the zfs command.

root@labsrv:~# zfs list |grep zones
rpool/zones                                  414M  73.9G    32K  /zones
rpool/zones/devzone                          414M  73.9G    32K  /zones/devzone
rpool/zones/devzone/rpool                    414M  73.9G    31K  /rpool
rpool/zones/devzone/rpool/ROOT               414M  73.9G    31K  legacy
rpool/zones/devzone/rpool/ROOT/solaris       414M  73.9G   390M  /zones/devzone/root
rpool/zones/devzone/rpool/ROOT/solaris/var  24.2M  73.9G  23.7M  /zones/devzone/root/var
rpool/zones/devzone/rpool/VARSHARE            31K  73.9G    31K  /var/share
rpool/zones/devzone/rpool/export              62K  73.9G    31K  /export
rpool/zones/devzone/rpool/export/home         31K  73.9G    31K  /export/home

You can see the /zones and /zones/devzone data sets have been created automatically for you. Having Oracle Solaris Zones on a ZFS data set enables functionality, such as cloning and snapshots, and allows Oracle Solaris Zones to take full advantage of ZFS.

Note: The size of devzone is only 414 MB. Oracle Solaris Zones have a minimal footprint, reflecting how lightweight Oracle Solaris Zones are as a virtualization technology.

Step 3: Boot and Complete the System Configuration

The final step in getting devzone up and running is to boot it and set up the system configuration.

1.      Run the following command to boot the zone and then access its console:

root@labsrv:~# zoneadm -z devzone boot; zlogin -C devzone

Note: The -C option to zlogin lets us access the zone console, that is, it takes us into the zone and lets us work within the zone.

Because no system configuration files are available, the System Configuration Tool starts up, as shown in image below.


2.      Press F2 to continue.
3.      Enter devzone as the computer name, as shown in image, highlight manually to manually configure the network, and then press F2 to continue.

Note: We do not select "Automatically" in this example, but if you were to select it, you would not have to enter any network information at all, because the configuration would be done for you.


4.      Enter the network settings appropriate for your network, as shown in image, and then press F2.
 

5.      We will not configure DNS at this time, so press F2.
 


6.      We will not set up a name service at this time, so press F2.



 
7.      Select the time zone region appropriate for your location, as shown in image, and press F2.



8.      Select the appropriate location, as shown in image, and then press F2.

  
9.      Select the appropriate time zone, as shown in image, and then press F2.
  



10. Complete your configuration by entering a root password, your name, a user name, and a user password, as shown in image. Then press F2.




11.      Verify that the configuration you have chosen is correct and apply the settings by pressing F2.
 

The zone will continue booting and soon you will see the console login, as shown in following.

SC profile successfully generated.
Exiting System Configuration Tool. Log is available at:
/system/volatile/sysconfig/sysconfig.log.3786
[ system/system-log:default starting (system log) ]
[ network/smtp:sendmail starting (sendmail SMTP mail transfer agent) ]
[ system/auditd:default starting (Solaris audit daemon) ]
[ network/sendmail-client:default starting (sendmail SMTP client queue runner) ]
[ system/console-login:default starting (Console login) ]

devzone console login:



The zone is now ready to be logged into. For this example, we will now exit the console using the "~." escape sequence.

You can check that your zone is booted and running by using the zoneadm command:

[Connection to zone 'devzone' console closed]
^[root@labsrv:~#

root@labsrv:~# zoneadm list -v
  ID NAME             STATUS     PATH                           BRAND    IP
   0 global           running    /                              solaris  shared
   1 devzone          running    /zones/devzone                 solaris  excl

As promised, a VNIC was automatically created for us when the zone was booted. We can check this by using the dladm command:

root@labsrv:~# dladm show-link
LINK                CLASS     MTU    STATE    OVER
net1                phys      1500   unknown  --
net0                phys      1500   up       --
devzone/net0        vnic      1500   up       net0

We can see the VNIC listed as devzone/net0.

Step 4: Log In to Your Zone


The last step is to log in to your zone and have a look about. You can do this from the global zone using the zlogin command, as shown in following.

root@labsrv:~# zlogin devzone
[Connected to zone 'devzone' pts/3]

root@devzone:~# uname -a
SunOS devzone 5.11 11.1 i86pc i386 i86pc

root@devzone:~# ipadm show-addr
ADDROBJ           TYPE     STATE        ADDR
lo0/v4            static   ok           127.0.0.1/8
net0/v4           static   ok           172.22.2.11/24
lo0/v6            static   ok           ::1/128
net0/v6           addrconf ok           fe80::8:20ff:fe2f:f01e/10

root@devzone:~# dladm show-link
LINK                CLASS     MTU    STATE    OVER
net0                vnic      1500   up       ?

root@devzone:~# zfs list
NAME                         USED  AVAIL  REFER  MOUNTPOINT
rpool                        445M  73.8G    31K  /rpool
rpool/ROOT                   445M  73.8G    31K  legacy
rpool/ROOT/solaris           445M  73.8G   416M  /
rpool/ROOT/solaris/var      24.3M  73.8G  23.8M  /var
rpool/VARSHARE                39K  73.8G    39K  /var/share
rpool/export                96.5K  73.8G    32K  /export
rpool/export/home           64.5K  73.8G    32K  /export/home
rpool/export/home/muhammad  32.5K  73.8G  32.5K  /export/home/Muhammad

root@devzone:~# exit
logout

[Connection to zone 'devzone' pts/3 closed]

Note: We did not use the -C option for the zlogin command, which means we are not accessing the zone via its console. This is why we can simply exit the shell at the end to leave the zone.
Let's look at what we found:
  • The uname command shows that we are running on Oracle Solaris 11.
  • The ipadm command shows the IP addresses for devzone. There are four entries, two loopback devices (IPv4 and IPv6), our IPv4 net0 device with an IP address of 172.22.2.11, and finally an IPv6 net0 device.
  • The dladm command shows our automatically created net0 VNIC.
  • The zfs list command shows us our ZFS data set.
Note: From within devzone, we cannot see any information about the global zone. We can see only the attributes of our own zone.
You have now verified that devzone is up and running. You can give the user logins and passwords to the development team's administrator, allowing that administrator to complete the setup of the team's zone as if it were a single system.

Oracle Solaris Zones and Networking

New in Oracle Solaris 11, Oracle Solaris Zones are now automatically created with an exclusive IP network resource by default. This means that an Oracle Solaris Zone has access to a complete network stack, allowing zone administrators to do such things as set their own IP address and routing.
When we used zonecfg to create devzone (in Step1: Configure an Oracle Solaris Zone) using the default template, a network resource called anet with the following properties was automatically included in the zone configuration:
  • linkname is net0
  • lower-link is auto
  • mac-address is random
  • link-protection is mac-nospoof
We can see this by using the zonecfg command, as shown in following.

root@labsrv:~# zonecfg -z devzone info
zonename: devzone
zonepath: /zones/devzone
brand: solaris
autoboot: true
bootargs:  -m verbose
file-mac-profile:
pool:
limitpriv:
scheduling-class:
ip-type: exclusive
hostid:
fs-allowed:
anet:
        linkname: net0
        lower-link: auto
        allowed-address not specified
        configure-allowed-address: true
        defrouter not specified
        allowed-dhcp-cids not specified
        link-protection: mac-nospoof
        mac-address: random
        auto-mac-address: 2:8:20:2f:f0:1e
        mac-prefix not specified
        mac-slot not specified
        vlan-id not specified
        priority not specified
        rxrings not specified
        txrings not specified
        mtu not specified
        maxbw not specified
        rxfanout not specified
        vsi-typeid not specified
        vsi-vers not specified
        vsi-mgrid not specified
        etsbw-lcl not specified
        cos not specified
        pkey not specified
        linkmode not specified

You can see that the anet network device has been automatically configured. As discussed earlier, this resource is created and destroyed automatically when the zone is booted and shut down, respectively. You can see this as follows.

First, check the IP address of your global zone:

root@labsrv:~# ipadm show-addr
ADDROBJ           TYPE     STATE        ADDR
lo0/v4            static   ok           127.0.0.1/8
net0/v4           static   ok           172.22.2.10/24

Use dladm to look at the data link status:

root@labsrv:~# dladm show-link
LINK                CLASS     MTU    STATE    OVER
net1                phys      1500   unknown  --
net0                phys      1500   up       --
devzone/net0        vnic      1500   up       net0

Note how a VNIC attached to net0 (devzone/net0) has been automatically created for devzone.
Log in to devzone, checking the link status and IP address and then ping the global zone, as shown in following.

root@labsrv:~# zlogin devzone
[Connected to zone 'devzone' pts/3]

root@devzone:~# dladm show-link
LINK                CLASS     MTU    STATE    OVER
net0                vnic      1500   up       ?

root@devzone:~# ipadm show-addr
ADDROBJ           TYPE     STATE        ADDR
lo0/v4            static   ok           127.0.0.1/8
net0/v4           static   ok           172.22.2.11/24
lo0/v6            static   ok           ::1/128
net0/v6           addrconf ok           fe80::8:20ff:fe2f:f01e/10

root@devzone:~# ping 172.22.2.10
172.22.2.10 is alive

root@devzone:~# exit
logout

[Connection to zone 'devzone' pts/3 closed]

Creating webappzone1 and Adding an Application

Now let's create our second zone, webappzone1, for our Web applications and add an application to it.

Step 1: Create webappzone1 with Minimum Information

Again we start by creating webappzone1 using zonecfg. However, this time, to demonstrate how quick and easy it is to set up a zone, we will supply the minimum required information, the zonepath:

root@labsrv:~# zonecfg -z webappzone1 "create ; set zonepath=/zones/webappzone1"

You can see the zone configuration by using the zonecfg command, as shown in following.

root@labsrv:~# zonecfg -z webappzone1 info
zonename: webappzone1
zonepath: /zones/webappzone1
brand: solaris
autoboot: false
bootargs:
file-mac-profile:
pool:
limitpriv:
scheduling-class:
ip-type: exclusive
hostid:
fs-allowed:
anet:
        linkname: net0
        lower-link: auto
        allowed-address not specified
        configure-allowed-address: true
        defrouter not specified
        allowed-dhcp-cids not specified
        link-protection: mac-nospoof
        mac-address: random
        mac-prefix not specified
        mac-slot not specified
        vlan-id not specified
        priority not specified
        rxrings not specified
        txrings not specified
        mtu not specified
        maxbw not specified
        rxfanout not specified
        vsi-typeid not specified
        vsi-vers not specified
        vsi-mgrid not specified
        etsbw-lcl not specified
        cos not specified
        pkey not specified
        linkmode not specified

That's it. As far as configuration, we are done.

Step 2: Install webappzone1

Next we install the zone, as shown in following.

root@labsrv:~# zoneadm -z webappzone1 install
The following ZFS file system(s) have been created:
    rpool/zones/webappzone1
Progress being logged to /var/log/zones/zoneadm.20130828T071920Z.webappzone1.install
       Image: Preparing at /zones/webappzone1/root.

 AI Manifest: /tmp/manifest.xml.LGa4el
  SC Profile: /usr/share/auto_install/sc_profiles/enable_sci.xml
    Zonename: webappzone1
Installation: Starting ...

              Creating IPS image
Startup linked: 1/1 done
              Installing packages from:
                  solaris
                      origin:  http://172.22.2.10/
DOWNLOAD                                PKGS         FILES    XFER (MB)   SPEED
Completed                            183/183   33556/33556  222.2/222.2  741k/s

PHASE                                          ITEMS
Installing new actions                   46825/46825
Updating package state database                 Done
Updating image state                            Done
Creating fast lookup database                   Done
Installation: Succeeded

        Note: Man pages can be obtained by installing pkg:/system/manual

 done.

        Done: Installation completed in 160.257 seconds.


  Next Steps: Boot the zone, then log into the zone console (zlogin -C)

              to complete the configuration process.

Log saved in non-global zone as /zones/webappzone1/root/var/log/zones/zoneadm.201

Step 3: Boot and Configure webappzone1


Boot webappzone1, log in to the console, and enter the same settings as we did for devzone except for the IP address. Set the IP address to 172.22.2.12.

root@labsrv:~# zoneadm -z webappzone1 boot; zlogin -C webappzone1
 
Refer back to Step 3: Boot and Complete the System Configuration if you are unsure of the steps. At the end, remember to exit from the console using the "~." escape sequence.

Adding an Application to webappzone1

Now that we have a running zone that is connected to the network, we want to put an application in it. In this case, because this is going to be a zone that serves our Web content, let's add the Apache Web server.

From the global zone, log in to webappzone1 and check the status of the Apache Web server package:


root@labsrv:~# zlogin webappzone1
[Connected to zone 'webappzone1' pts/3]
Oracle Corporation      SunOS 5.11      11.1    September 2012

root@webappzone1:~# pkg info /web/server/apache-22
pkg: info: no packages matching the following patterns you specified are
installed on the system.  Try specifying -r to query remotely:

        /web/server/apache-22

The package is not installed. Let's double-check by querying remotely against the IPS repository using the -r option, as shown in following.

root@webappzone1:~# pkg info -r /web/server/apache-22
          Name: web/server/apache-22
       Summary: Apache Web Server V2.2
   Description: The Apache HTTP Server Version 2.2
      Category: Web Services/Application and Web Servers
         State: Not installed
     Publisher: solaris
       Version: 2.2.22
 Build Release: 5.11
        Branch: 0.175.1.0.0.24.0
Packaging Date: September  4, 2012 05:50:58 PM
          Size: 9.15 MB
          FMRI: pkg://solaris/web/server/apache-22@2.2.22,5.11-0.175.1.0.0.24.0:20120904T175058Z

The state is shown as Not installed. So let's install the Apache Web server into our zone, as shown in following.

Installing the Apache Web Server Package


root@webappzone1:~# pkg install /web/server/apache-22
           Packages to install:  7
       Create boot environment: No
Create backup boot environment: No
            Services to change:  1

DOWNLOAD                                PKGS         FILES    XFER (MB)   SPEED
Completed                                7/7       665/665      8.7/8.7 58.7k/s

PHASE                                          ITEMS
Installing new actions                       916/916
Updating package state database                 Done
Updating image state                            Done
Creating fast lookup database                   Done

We see that IPS downloads all the related files we need. There is no need to figure out the dependencies. In this case, three packages were installed. We can check the status of the Apache Web server by using the pkg info command again, as shown in following.

root@webappzone1:~# pkg info /web/server/apache-22
          Name: web/server/apache-22
       Summary: Apache Web Server V2.2
   Description: The Apache HTTP Server Version 2.2
      Category: Web Services/Application and Web Servers
         State: Installed
     Publisher: solaris
       Version: 2.2.22
 Build Release: 5.11
        Branch: 0.175.1.0.0.24.0
Packaging Date: September  4, 2012 05:50:58 PM
          Size: 9.15 MB
          FMRI: pkg://solaris/web/server/apache-22@2.2.22,5.11-0.175.1.0.0.24.0:20120904T175058Z

This time, the state is shown as Installed. Congratulations; you have added your first package to a zone.

Creating webappzone2 Using a Clone

Now let's create the final zone, webappzone2. We could just repeat the process that we used to create the other zones, but in this case, we simply want another Web server environment just like webappzone1. Instead of having to duplicate the configuration process, let's make a clone of webzoneapp1. We are effectively using webappzone1 as a global master for zone creation.

Step 1: Create a Zone System Configuration Template

To avoid having to manually configure the system properties of our cloned zone, let's first create a system ID template for webappzone2. We can do this by using the sysconfig tool from within webappzone1:
root@labsrv:~# zlogin webappzone1
[Connected to zone 'webappzone1' pts/3]

root@webappzone1:~# sysconfig create-profile -o /root/webappzone2-template.xml
SC profile successfully generated.
Exiting System Configuration Tool. Log is available at:
/system/volatile/sysconfig/sysconfig.log.8359

Note: When using the sysconfig tool to create a profile, make sure you use the .xml extension in your output file name.

Go through the screens entering the correct information for webappzone2 (remember to use 172.22.2.13 as the IP address this time). As in the Step 3: Boot and Complete the System Configuration section, when the configuration has been completed, you will see that your configuration file has been created. Finally, log out back to the global zone.

root@webappzone1:~# ls
webappzone2-template.xml

root@webappzone1:~# exit
logout

[Connection to zone 'webappzone1' pts/3 closed]

Note: When using the sysconfig tool, you are not allowed to use any existing user names in the user account section. In our case, we could not use the user name jamal so we chose asif instead.
We'll copy this file to a more convenient location in a later step.

Step 2: Create the Zone Profile File

From the global zone on our system, we first need to halt webappzone1, the zone we want to clone. (You should not clone a running zone.) We use zoneadm list to verify that the zone is shut down, as shown in following

Verifying the Zone is Shut Down.

root@labsrv:~# zoneadm list -iv
  ID NAME             STATUS     PATH                           BRAND    IP
   0 global           running    /                              solaris  shared
   1 devzone          running    /zones/devzone                 solaris  excl
   2 webappzone1      running    /zones/webappzone1             solaris  excl

root@labsrv:~# zoneadm -z webappzone1 shutdown

root@labsrv:~# zoneadm list -iv
  ID NAME             STATUS     PATH                           BRAND    IP
   0 global           running    /                              solaris  shared
   1 devzone          running    /zones/devzone                 solaris  excl
   - webappzone1      installed  /zones/webappzone1             solaris  excl

Now let's capture the configuration of the zone and use it as a master profile template for other zones we will create, in this case, webappzone2:

root@labsrv:~# zonecfg -z webappzone1 export -f /zones/webappzone2-profile

Using your favorite editor, make the file read as shown in following. (You always need to update the zonepath, but we have also chosen to update autoboot.)

Editing the Template

root@labsrv:~# cat /zones/webappzone2-profile
create -b
set brand=solaris
set zonepath=/zones/webappzone2
set autoboot=true
set ip-type=exclusive
add anet
set linkname=net0
set lower-link=auto
set configure-allowed-address=true
set link-protection=mac-nospoof
set mac-address=random
end

We now want to place the system configuration template (webappzone2-template.xml) we created earlier in a more convenient location. Fortunately, you can access a zone's file system while it is shut down:
root@labsrv:~# pwd
/root
root@labsrv:~# cp /zones/webappzone1/root/root/webappzone2-template.xml /zones
root@labsrv:~# ls /zones/webappzone2-template.xml
/zones/webappzone2-template.xml

Step 3: Create webappzone2 by Cloning webappzone1

Next create webappzone2 using the modified configuration (by using zonecfg), and then perform the clone of webappzone1 (by using zoneadm). Remember to add the full path to the system config template. Note how quickly the clone is completed. (We can see this by prepending the time command to our zonecfg clone command.)

root@labsrv:~# zonecfg -z webappzone2 -f /zones/webappzone2-profile

root@labsrv:~# time zoneadm -z webappzone2 clone -c /zones/webappzone2-template.xml webappzone1
The following ZFS file system(s) have been created:
    rpool/zones/webappzone2
Progress being logged to /var/log/zones/zoneadm.20130828T081633Z.webappzone2.clone
Log saved in non-global zone as /zones/webappzone2/root/var/log/zones/zoneadm.20130828T081633Z.webappzone2.clone

real    0m26.292s
user    0m4.122s
sys     0m7.142s

The cloning of webappzone1 took only 26 seconds. In addition, because we used the clone command, we took advantage of a ZFS snapshot. Let's check the disk space taken by both webappzone1 and webappzone2, as shown in following.

Checking Disk Space

root@labsrv:/zones# zfs list | grep webappzone
rpool/zones/webappzone1                            471M  73.4G    33K  /zones/webappzone1
rpool/zones/webappzone1/rpool                      470M  73.4G    31K  /rpool
rpool/zones/webappzone1/rpool/ROOT                 470M  73.4G    31K  legacy
rpool/zones/webappzone1/rpool/ROOT/solaris         470M  73.4G   434M  /zones/webappzone1/root
rpool/zones/webappzone1/rpool/ROOT/solaris/var    30.0M  73.4G  24.6M  /zones/webappzone1/root/var
rpool/zones/webappzone1/rpool/VARSHARE              39K  73.4G    39K  /var/share
rpool/zones/webappzone1/rpool/export              96.5K  73.4G    32K  /export
rpool/zones/webappzone1/rpool/export/home         64.5K  73.4G    32K  /export/home
rpool/zones/webappzone1/rpool/export/home/jamal   32.5K  73.4G  32.5K  /export/home/jamal
rpool/zones/webappzone2                            372K  73.4G    34K  /zones/webappzone2
rpool/zones/webappzone2/rpool                      338K  73.4G    31K  /rpool
rpool/zones/webappzone2/rpool/ROOT                 316K  73.4G    31K  legacy
rpool/zones/webappzone2/rpool/ROOT/solaris-0       314K  73.4G   434M  /zones/webappzone2/root
rpool/zones/webappzone2/rpool/ROOT/solaris-0/var  46.5K  73.4G  24.6M  /zones/webappzone2/root/var
rpool/zones/webappzone2/rpool/VARSHARE               1K  73.4G    39K  /var/share
rpool/zones/webappzone2/rpool/export                 3K  73.4G    32K  /export
rpool/zones/webappzone2/rpool/export/home            2K  73.4G    32K  /export/home
rpool/zones/webappzone2/rpool/export/home/jamal      1K  73.4G  32.5K  /export/home/jamal

Even after we added the Apache Web server, webappzone1 is only 470 M. Even better, webappzone2, an exact copy of webappzone1, is only 338 K, providing a great savings on disk space.
Finally, boot webappzone2 and watch the console. Occasionally, you will see the system configuration being applied. You can see below that the host name has been set for us from the template.

root@labsrv:/# zoneadm -z webappzone2 boot; zlogin -C webappzone2
[Connected to zone 'webappzone2' console]


SunOS Release 5.11 Version 11.1 64-bit
Copyright (c) 1983, 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.
Hostname: unknown
Hostname: webappzone2

webappzone2 console login:

Note that we now have a .xml template for webappzone2. We could very easily copy and edit this template to allow us to deploy a whole set of other Web zones just as quickly.
Now log in to webappzone2 and look for the Apache Web server package, as shown in following.

Looking for the Apache Web Server Package


root@labsrv:/# zlogin webappzone2
[Connected to zone 'webappzone2' pts/3]
Oracle Corporation      SunOS 5.11      11.1    September 2012

root@webappzone2:~# pkg info /web/server/apache-22
          Name: web/server/apache-22
       Summary: Apache Web Server V2.2
   Description: The Apache HTTP Server Version 2.2
      Category: Web Services/Application and Web Servers
         State: Installed
     Publisher: solaris
       Version: 2.2.22
 Build Release: 5.11
        Branch: 0.175.1.0.0.24.0
Packaging Date: September  4, 2012 05:50:58 PM
          Size: 9.15 MB
          FMRI: pkg://solaris/web/server/apache-22@2.2.22,5.11-0.175.1.0.0.24.0:20120904T175058Z

As you can see, unlike before, when we created a zone from scratch, the Apache Web server package that we had to add to webappzone1 is here already. This cloning method is frequently used when a "master" zone is created with all the additional packages and configuration in place. The master zone is then simply cloned as new, similar environments are required.



We can also check that the IP address was applied correctly:

root@webappzone2:~# ipadm show-addr
ADDROBJ           TYPE     STATE        ADDR
lo0/v4            static   ok           127.0.0.1/8
net0/v4           static   ok           172.22.2.13/24
lo0/v6            static   ok           ::1/128
net0/v6           addrconf ok           fe80::8:20ff:fee2:533d/10

Note: The Oracle Solaris Automated Installer also provides a method for creating ready-made zones as part of the system install service.

2 comments:

  1. I am new to Solaris and zones ,this helped however a question is that If I have Solaris 10 do I need to install ZFS initially during installation or UFS will work ?

    BR
    praveen

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well this guide is specifically for Solaris 11 but if you have Solaris 10 you can still configure zones on UFS but there is another article for Solaris 10 zone. You can search from search box or click on Solaris to see all Solaris related posts and then go for Solaris 10 zones.

      Delete

 
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